Off the Shelf: A Review of Sweet Madness by Trisha Leaver and Lindsay Curie

sweetmadness

“The house I was working in was filled with crazy people, and everyone in Fall River knew it…including me.”


Funny that I just said in my review of Wolf by Wolf by Ryan Graudin that I’d always considered myself not such a fan of alternate history/historical fiction, and here I am reading yet another young adult historical fiction novel so soon.

I don’t know what drew me to Sweet Madness. I’ve always thought the Lizzie Borden murders were an interesting mystery, and sure, I’d watch a documentary or two about it if it was on… But I wouldn’t say that I’d go out of my way to learn more about Lizzie and her family. So, picking this book out of the many new arrivals at the library to start reading at lunch made me surprise myself. This somewhat long description from Goodreads did peak my interest though and is worth the read:

“Seventeen-year-old Bridget Sullivan is alone in Fall River, a city that sees Irish immigrants as nothing more than a drunken drain on society. To make matters worse, she’s taken employment with the city’s most peculiar and gossip-laden family—the Bordens. But Bridget can’t afford to be picky—the pay surpasses any other job Bridget could ever secure and she desperately needs the money to buy her little sister, Cara, passage to the states. It doesn’t hurt that the job location is also close to her beau, Liam. As she enters the disturbing inner workings of the Borden household, Bridget clings to these advantages. However, what seemed like a straightforward situation soon turns into one that is untenable. Of course Bridget has heard the gossip around town about the Bordens, but what she encounters is far more unsettling. The erratic, paranoid behavior of Mr. Borden, the fearful silence of his wife, and worse still…the nightly whisperings Bridget hears that seem to come from the walls themselves. The unexpected bright spot of the position is that Lizzie Borden is so friendly. At first, Bridget is surprised at how Lizzie seems to look out for her, how she takes a strong interest in Bridget’s life. Over time, a friendship grows between them. But when Mr. Borden’s behavior goes from paranoid to cruel, and the eerie occurrences in the house seem to be building momentum, Bridget makes the tough decision that she must leave the house—even if it means leaving behind Lizzie, her closest friend, alone with the madness. Something she swore she would not do. But when Bridget makes a horrifying discovery in the home, all that she thought she knew about the Bordens is called into question…including if Lizzie is dangerous. And the choice she must make about Lizzie’s character could mean Bridget’s life or death. SWEET MADNESS is a retelling of the infamous Borden murders from the point of view of Lizzie’s Irish maid, Bridget Sullivan.”

Have you ever had someone take an unnatural interest in your life to the point it made you uncomfortable? The skin still prickles on the back of my neck when I think of my personal experience with that, and I had that same feeling for the main character Bridget as Lizzie’s true colors started to show. Normally, I don’t like historical fiction because playing around with actual people as characters seems almost intrusive. No one actually knows what happened at the Borden home when Andrew Borden and his wife were murdered, but it’s clear that the authors have done a fair amount of research to set the scene and make their theory of how it all went down plausible.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Off the Shelf – A Review of The Sleeper & the Spindle

My first book of 2015 was This is Not a Test  by Courtney Summers, and I vividly remember finishing the book and immediately tossing it across the room in frustration. Just in case I forgot, Timehop decided to remind me.

IMG_4979-0

I can’t say what in particular made me dislike the book, but I do know that I was disappointed that my new year of new reads kicked off with a dud. I was determined not to let that happen again this year.

At the start of January, I began reading Da Vinci’s Tiger by L. M. Elliott, December’s book from OwlCrate. I made it through the first 60-80 pages, and I’ve had to temporarily set the book aside. The story is somewhat slow and just hasn’t captured me yet, so I began to worry that I would have a repeat of last year. I’m sure Da Vinci’s Tiger is probably wonderful, and I just haven’t given it enough of a shot yet, but I’m not taking any chances. So, I returned it to the nightstand, and I went in search of a guaranteed good read.

I normally stick to reading and reviewing mostly Young Adult books, but occasionally, I may choose one of certain relevance or that Young Adult readers may enjoy – such as this time. It may just be personal bias, but I believe Neil Gaiman transcends most all age groups and genres. So, while The Sleeper and the Spindle may look like an ordinary picture book, just one look inside can tell you that it is much, much more.

sleeper“Learning how to be strong, to feel her own emotions and not another’s, had been hard; but once you learned the trick of it, you did not forget.”

Continue reading